Archive for 2016 年 8 月 2 日

HOW DO TURBOCHARGER WASTEGATES WORK?

It’s the snail of mystery attached to your engine.

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With the wonders of forced induction, a smaller engine can create the horsepower and torque of a larger-displacement engine.

Engineering Explained goes into a bit more detail (with a lot more clarity) than that. Also, the video below briefly explains the difference between internal and external wastegates. Now that you possess this knowledge, go forth into the world and impress your automotive enthusiast friends the next time the topic of Turbos spools up.

 

6 TIPS TO PROTECT YOUR TURBOCHARGER It might just save you some money.

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Today, almost every car is fitted with at least one turbocharger and many drivers are not aware of its existence, until failure begins to take place leaving you a nasty bill.

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Below is a list of way to protect your turbocharger against premature failure, follow these simple driving tips and it’ll help you:

 

1.   When starting your car from cold, do not race the engine immediately from idle. Allow between 5-10 seconds for the engine oil to reach the turbocharger.

2.   Never operate the engine under full power until the engine oil has warmed thoroughly. When the lubricant is cold, it remains thick and gloopy and cannot lubricate the turbocharger effectively, until warmed and thinned.

3.   Old and tired oil cannot protect the turbocharger adequately. Therefore, do not extend the oil change interval beyond that recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.

4.   Low-grade oil cannot protect the turbocharger adequately. Therefore, always use oil of not only the correct viscosity but also to the correct quality API specification (the details are noted within the vehicle handbook and also on the sides of canisters).

5.   A turbocharger works its hardest during sustained high speeds. After a long motorway drive, it is possible that a turbocharger might be glowing orangey-red hot. Shutting the engine off immediately after a long run, such as when stopping at a motorway service station, might cause severe damage, because the internal turbine will not have slowed down sufficiently, plus the extreme heat generated may not been given sufficient opportunity to dissipate. Always allow the engine to idle for at least 30 seconds, prior to switching off the ignition. If your car is equipped with ‘stop-start’ technology, disable it in this instance, should it be switchable.

6.   Never ‘blip’ the throttle, prior to switching off the ignition. This makes the turbocharger’s turbines accelerate but, when the ignition is cut, you starve the still-rotating turbine of lubricant. This can damage the bearings and increases the risk of premature failure substantially.

 

5 THINGS YOU SHOULDN’T DO IN A TURBOCHARGED VEHICLE.

 

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You already know that your engine likes to breathe, sure we all do but there are ways to make it breathe easier. One of these ways is by stuffing as much air as possible into the engine’s “throat.” You’re forcing the induction and to do that you’ll need a turbocharger. Turbochargers are like magic some say! Witchcraft happens and you go faster.

Our friends at Engineering Explained cover the basics in great detail in the video below covering not only what you shouldn’t do but also why. One of the many important parts that is often overlooked. So let Turbo Dynamics go through with you now the 5 things you should never do in a turbocharged vehicle.

 

1. DON’T RUN YOUR CAR IMMEDIATELY

Firstly, don’t run your vehicle straight away after you turn it on. Your engine needs to warm up properly, but more importantly it’s the oil in this case that needs to come to a proper operating temperature.

 

2. DON’T SWITCH OFF IMMEDIATELY

Secondly, make sure you don’t switch your car off right away after spirited driving. If you let everything cool down, you have consistent oil temperatures circulating through your engine components and that’s a good place to shut everything down.

 

3. DON’T LUG YOUR ENGINE

Lugging your engine by travelling slowly is a bad idea, but by putting your vehicle in a higher gear you should be alright. This puts needless strain on a number of parts.

 

4. OCTANE FUEL – DON’T USE LOWER THAN RECOMMENDED.

Something you may know already, don’t use lower octane fuel than what’s recommended. Most often an engine with a turbo is running at lower compression rate, it needs the higher octane fuel to prevent knocking & other issues.

 

5. IF YOU HAVE A LAGGY TURBO – DON’T MASH THE THROTTLE

When exiting a corner that is! Now this one comes down to your car’s setup and of course your driving skill. If you accelerate and it takes a bit for your turbo to spool up, you’re going to have a shot of power when you don’t want it. If you’re not pointing in the right direction & the wheel is turned, you may end up with more understeer or a little bit of oversteer when all you want is a clean line.